What I Read in June

Ahhhh, sweet summertime. Wait, just kidding — this is my least favorite season by FAR. Thankfully, though, the days are longer and the extra sunlight motivates me to read even more than usual… so I guess that’s a win for this time of year, even if I hate being sweaty and am convinced the humidity is out to get me. ANYWAY.

Here’s what I read this June!

ps— affiliate links are included!


my top rec:

City of Girls by Elizabeth Gilbert

my 2019 goal progress:

17 books this month

80/150 total


Red, White & Royal Blue by Casey McQuiston

rating: ★★★★☆

review: This one surprised me and I ended up looooooving it! It’s far fetched but so great to imagine an enemy turned frenemy turned bromance turned romance situation between the first son of a US president and a prince of England, and I found it so fun and enjoyable to read. I realized I’ve never read a YA romance that featured two men (one gay and one bisexual)! If you’re super conservative, this wouldn’t be the book for you, but I found it to be delightful and the perfect summer read. All about diversifying what i read!


You, Me, and the Sea by Meg Donohue

rating: ★★★☆☆

review: A modern retelling of Wuthering Heights (which I haven’t read so can’t expound on!) with a love triangle, beautiful writing and a strong sense of place, enough suspense to keep me hooked, and a predictable ending. The first half was honestly hard to read because of an abusive older brother character, but I was able to stick it out and move past that to a less intense storyline. I’m torn on my thoughts on this one— it both felt slow and rushed, unique and predictable all at the same time... but I did enjoy it!


From the Corner of the Oval by Beck Dorey-Stein

rating: ★★★★☆

review: I looooved this one. I abandoned a Obama-era memoir this month that wasn’t doing it for me and this one not only made up for it but totally exceeded my hopes. It was lively and spunky and fun and not at all the political memoir I expected (more love/dating/hookups! less actual political talk! more behind the scenes peeks!) — big fan. Glad @girlsnightinclub chose this as their monthly book club pick to prompt me to grab it!


I Love You So Mochi by Sarah Kuhn

rating: ★★★★☆

review: This book was ADORABLE and lovely and just so delightful. Love a good exploration of self and ancestry, love an honest developing mom/daughter dynamic, love a sweet love story, love a strong and quirky female lead... such a winning YA read!


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The Art of Noticing: 131 Ways to Spark Creativity, Find Inspiration, and Discover Joy in the Everyday by Rob Walker

rating: ★★★★★

review: Big fan of this one— already added it to my Amazon cart so I can have a copy on hand whenever I need a creative boost! It’s chock full of exercises (from easy to more advanced) to help you really keep your eyes open, fuel your creative fire, and stay inspired, and I looooved it. I already put a few into action (and felt super validated by some I already do!) and found them so helpful and motivating.


Inward by Yung Pueblo

rating: ★★★★★

review: So glad a friend told me about this one — these poems are ones i have savored over the last few months and always found to be exactly the words I needed each and every time I’ve picked them up. So poignant, beautiful, simple yet deeply meaningful... loved them.


All the Missing Girls by Megan Miranda

rating: ★★☆☆☆

review: This book baffled me. It’s a thriller that goes back in time and maybe I just wasn’t reading it when I was focused enough, but I could not track with the plot and all the characters. I skimmed most of it after the first 100 or so pages, trying to get the gist of how it all played out, and I was unimpressed. I do think the concept is intriguing, and feel like it might have just not been the book for me in this season of needing easier reads…


The Hating Game by Sally Thorne

rating: ★★★☆☆

review: This book was sexy and steamy and fun — predictable, yes, but delightful and the perfect summer afternoon read. Not for PG audiences (🔥🔥🔥) but I was a big fan! Anyone else love this one?!


The Identicals by Elin Hilderbrand

rating: ★★★☆☆

review: Grabbed this one to read by the pool last weekend, and although it felt pretty slow and unnecessarily long for the overall plot, I liked it in the end! It definitely got better as it went on and it didn’t have a really compelling grab in any way, but it was an easy read and held my attention. Some definite Parent Trap vibes here (twins got separated to each go with a parent after their divorce and they have a falling out, but later end up switching lives due to drama, etc)


Beyond the Point by Claire Gibson

rating: ★★★★☆

review: A book hasn’t made me cry in a while. This one definitely did. Female friendships + parallel storylines + West Point and military service = suuuuuch a solid read. Big fan.


November 9 by Colleen Hoover

rating: ★★★★★

review: SO GOOD SO GOOD SO GOOD. Not at all what I expected (the cover threw me off for some reason?) but as soon as I picked this one off my shelf and read the first few pages to see if I should return it or keep it, I was hooked! Literally read it all in one sitting that night 😂 If that isn’t a rave review, I don’t know what is.


Artemis by Andy Weir

rating: ★★★★☆

review: I listened to The Martian on audio back when it came out (I RARELY listen to audiobooks but I totally loved it!) and I’ve had this other Andy Weir book on my shelf for a while but just got around to it. I was HOOKED on this one from the start and did not want to put it down! It felt a bit slow at times but the plot went places I did not expect and surprises kept happening that had me shocked and totally engrossed. It’s very different from The Martian— less technical and scientific and more story-driven (feels much more fictional than Martian feeling more realistic) and I was a big fan of seeing this side of Weir’s writing! So good.


Ask Again, Yes by Mary Beth Keane

rating: ★★★☆☆

review: This one is a sloooooow burn and a decades-spanning look at two neighboring families and specifically two characters over their lifetimes... I didn’t love it, didn’t hate it, found it to be realistic, and am glad I’m finished with it. Take that for what you will.


The Unhoneymooners by Christina Lauren

rating: ★★★☆☆

review: Completely predictable, still totally enjoyable. Think The Hating Game book + The Wedding Date movie and you’ve got this one! (Liked Hating Game more, though.)


I’m Possible: Jumping into Fear and Discovering a Life of Purpose by Jeremy Cowart

rating: ★★★☆☆

review: Thanks to BookLook Bloggers for this one! // I’ve followed Jeremy on Instagram for a while so I know snippets of his story, but this was a great read diving deeper into his creative pursuits, his boldness in taking risks and chasing dreams, and his successful and surprising career over the years. It’s more reflective than instructive, but there are many motivational lessons to be learned along the way!


Out East: Memoir of a Montauk Summer by John Glynn

rating: ★★☆☆☆

review: Two bookstagram friends recommended this one when I asked for summer reads— It’s a memoir focusing on a summer in Montauk, written in a stream of consciousness style with tons of flashbacks and anecdotes and thoughts all woven together. It wasn’t my most favorite style of writing, but I did find myself getting more into it as it went on, and as the author’s character developed more and his understanding of his sexuality began to unfold more. The lifestyle of living summer weekends at a beach house with 20+ other adults and constantly flowing alcohol is a little baffling and bizarre to me, but surely makes for an interesting story!


City of Girls by Elizabeth Gilbert

rating: ★★★★★

review: This book has ruined me. I adored it. Every page. Every layer. Every line. I want to start it over again right now just so it never has to end. Magic, magic, magic.


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